Connect with us

Education

First Artificial Intelligence University Established in UAE

Published

 on

First Artificial Intelligence University Established in UAE

The first Artificial Intelligence (AI) focused university has been established in Abu Dhabi, the capital of the United Arab Emirates (UAE). It will be a graduate-level university with a heavy focus on research,  and it is called Mohammed Bin Zayed University of Artificial Intelligence (MBZUAI).

According to the Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi, “Launching the world’s first graduate-level AI university in Abu Dhabi echoes the UAE’s pioneering spirit, and paves the way for a new era of innovation and technological advancement that benefits the UAE and the world.” 

The establishment of MBZUAI was announced at a press conference at the campus of the university, located in a suburb of the capital called Masdar City. 

“The Mohamed bin Zayed University of Artificial Intelligence (MBZUAI) is an open invitation from Abu Dhabi to the world to unleash AI’s full potential,” UAE’s Minister of State Sultan Ahmed Al Jaber said. 

State Sultan Ahmed Al Jaber was appointed to be chair of the board of trustees at the university. 

New Era of Technological Advancement

The university will have some of the best facilities and equipment related to AI. There will be both masters programs lasting two years as well as PhD ones lasting four years. The university will accept both local and international graduate students, and there will be three main specialty fields including machine learning, computer vision, and natural language processing

Official applications for acceptance into the university will start this month, and registrations will happen next August. The first classes are set to officially begin in September 2020. 

Dr. Sultan Al Jaber spoke at the official press conference opening. 

“The world has entered a new era of technological advancement and rapid innovation, all driven and underpinned by AI. This new era will pave the way for unprecedented opportunities, AI has become a priority and evident across all industries with new technologies being introduced at an incredibly fast pace,” he said.

“The world needs more human capacity in the field of AI to bridge any possible gaps and that is why today the UAE and Abu Dhabi is announcing the launch of Mohammad Bin Zayed University of Artificial Intelligence – the world’s first graduate level research-based AI university,” he added.

“This university will help us to develop the necessary AI eco system that will enable us to leverage the full potential of this very important technology locally, regionally and globally. The university will create an active AI community in the UAE developing innovative applications for businesses and government,” he said. 

A Team With Extensive Background in AI

The university is joined by Sir Michael Brady, who is the interim president and a member of the board of trustees. He has an extensive background in Artificial Intelligence, robotics, and imagery. He has spoken about the university and said that it was part of a move towards a knowledge-based economy, something that is taking place within the UAE. 

“This began with the government of the UAE formulating the strategy to transform the economy to the post oil era… To invest in developing competence in renewable energy, financial services, healthcare, materials technology and others,” he said. 

“[One of the main] enabling technologies is AI, and then you ask what are the risks in realising that [vision]… and the answer Is people…[So] how are we going to produce the right number of people with the right mindset [and] the right knowledge in order to lead and provide the technical leadership in these areas. That is what this university is about – providing that person power over the next 5 to 10 to 20 years,” he added. 

The establishment of the first ever university dedicated to Artificial Intelligence is a huge step forward in the field. It will likely cause more to open, and it will further dedicate resources and people to the most important development in modern history. 

 

Spread the love

Alex McFarland is a historian and journalist covering the newest developments in artificial intelligence.

Education

New AI Curriculum Designed for Middle School Students

Published

on

New AI Curriculum Designed for Middle School Students

A new curriculum has been designed by MIT researchers and collaborators to teach middle school students about artificial intelligence (AI). It aims to bring awareness of the technology to the sector of the population which is growing about surrounded by AI.

The open-source educational material was piloted at Massachusetts STEM week in the fall of 2019.  It covers aspects of the technology such as how AI systems are designed, ways they can be used to influence the public, and their role within the future job market. 

Back in October during Mass STEM Week, many middle schools within the commonwealth had a change in curriculum. There was an immersive week of hands-on learning, and it was led by a team consisting of Cynthia Breazeal, associate professor of media arts and sciences at MIT; Randi Williams ‘18, graduate research assistant in the Personal Robots Group at the MIT Media Lab; and i2 Learning, a nonprofit organization.

“Preparing students for the future means having them engage in technology through hands-on activities. We provide students with tools and conceptual frameworks where we want them to engage with our materials as conscientious designers of AI-enabled technologies,” Breazeal says. “As they think through designing a solution to address a problem in their community, we get them to think critically about the ethical implications of the technology.”

The idea to bring awareness of the technology to young students began three years ago with the Personal Robots Group. They started a program meant to teach AI concepts to preschoolers, and it then spread to other learning experiences and more children. Eventually, the group developed a curriculum for middle school students. An AI curriculum was piloted in Somerville, Massachusetts last Spring. 

“We want to make a curriculum in which middle-schoolers can build and use AI — and, more importantly, we want them to take into account the societal impact of any technology,” says Williams.

The curriculum is called How to Train Your Robot, and it was first piloted during an i2 summer camp in Boston. It was then presented to teachers by students during Mass STEM Week, and some of the teachers took part in two days of professional development training. The training was aimed at preparing the teachers to give more than 20 class hours of AI content to students. The curriculum was used within three schools across six classrooms. 

Blakeley Hoffman Payne, a graduate research assistant in the Personal Robots Group, was responsible for some of the work in the AI curriculum. Payne’s research focuses on the ethics of artificial intelligence and how to teach children to design, use, and think about AI. Students took part in discussions and creative activities, such as designing robot companions and deploying machine-learning to solve problems. Students then shared their inventions with their communities. 

“AI is an area that is becoming increasingly important in people’s lives,” says Ethan Berman, founder of i2 Learning and MIT parent. “This curriculum is very relevant to both students and teachers. Beyond just being a class on technology, it focuses on what it means to be a global citizen.”

One of the projects involved students building a “library robot” that was designed to locate and retrieve books for people with mobility challenges. Students had to take things into account such as how the technology would affect the job of a librarian and how it impacts the work.

The curriculum could be expanded to more classrooms and schools, and other disciplines could be added. Some other possible disciplines include social studies, math, science, art, and music, and the ways in which these can be implemented into the AI projects will be explored. 

“We hope students walk away with a different understanding of AI and how it works in the world,” says Williams, “and that they feel empowered to play an important role in shaping the technology.”

 

Spread the love
Continue Reading

Education

Finland Releases Crash Course in Artificial Intelligence

Published

on

Finland Releases Crash Course in Artificial Intelligence

Finland has released a crash course in artificial intelligence (AI) to all European Union citizens. The release came as a sort of Christmas gift, and the course will be free-of-charge. The six-week program will be available for anyone to take, and the course was translated into every EU language. The course is not restricted by location, so individuals outside of the EU can take it as well. At the end of the year, Finland will relinquish the EU’s rotating presidency. 

The course is popular in Finland, and more than 1 percent of the 5.5 million citizens of the nation signed up. The course is called Elements of AI, and it provides a way for individuals to learn the basics of artificial intelligence (AI). With the growing influence of AI technology in our society, it is important for people to be prepared and have a basic understanding. 

Also working on the project is the University of Helsinki, which is Finland’s largest and oldest academic institution. They are joined by the Finland-based tech consultancy Reaktor. 

The course is a $2 million project and a “civics course in AI,” according to Teemu Roos, a University of Helsinki associate professor in the department of computer science. He said that it is meant to help EU citizens become accustomed to the changing of the economy and increasing digitalization. 

WIthin the course, elementary AI concepts are covered. It does not cover harder concepts such as coding.

“We have enormous potential in Europe but what we lack is investments into AI,” Roos said. That comes at a time when other nations such as China are pouring money into AI technology.

The project is financed by the Finnish Ministry for Economic Affairs and Employment. According to officials, the course is meant for all EU citizens, no matter their age, education or profession. 

Finland launched “The Elements of AI” back in 2018, and it has been extremely successful. It is the most popular course ever offered by the University of Helsinki. The university dates back to 1640, and the course has had over 220,000 students from more than 110 countries, according to Roos. 

A quarter of the students who have enrolled are aged 45 and older, and about 40% are women. In what is often a male-dominated industry, the share of women among the Finnish participants is about 60%. 

The course consists of several modules, and it lasts around 6 weeks full time. If it is taken at a slower pace, it will last about six months. The current languages are Finnish, English, Swedish and Estonian, and the university is set to translate it to the remaining 20 of the EU’s official languages. That should be completed within the next two years. 

Megan Schaible is the COO of Reaktor Education, and she spoke about the collaboration between the company and the university. According to her, they are working together “to prove that AI should not be left in the hands of a few elite coders.”

Whoever passes the course will receive an official University of Helsinki diploma, and many EU universities could give credits for the course. If that is the case, students could include it in their curriculum.

Finland has become an important nation in the tech industry. Back in September, Google created the free-of-charge Digital Garage training hub in the capital. Its purpose is to help individuals find jobs, as well as entrepreneurs and children to increase their digital skills.

 

Spread the love
Continue Reading

Education

A New Report Claims Artificial Intelligence Skills Will Be Most In-Demand

mm

Published

on

A New Report Claims Artificial Intelligence Skills Will Be Most In-Demand

Udemy, the largest online learning source, just published its Udemy for Business  2020 Workplace Learning Trends Report: The Skills of the Future (48 pp., PDF, opt-in). As Forbes noticed, the report claims that it is now key “to prepare workforces for the future of work in an AI-enabled world.” The report states that “In the world of finance, investment funds managed by AI and computers account for 35% of America’s stock market today,” citing a recent article in The EconomistThe rise of the financial machines.

For their part, in the report, Udemy notes that AI is reshaping the world of work. The organization notes that 65% of the leaders cited that AI and robotics are an important or very important issue in human capital. Still, only  26% of the organizations Udemy surveyed are ready or very ready to dress the impact of these new technologies.

Udemy notes five key trends in 2020:

Trend 1 – AI will go mainstream in 2020

Trend 2 – 2020 is about realizing the full potential of humans and machines

Trend 3 – Learning & development is starting to tackle reskilling the workforce

Trend 4 – Organizations are building a data-driven culture

Trend 5 – Countries across the world are upskilling in highly coveted tech skills

Detailing their predictions concerning specifically AI and robotics, the Udemy report also notes that TensorFlow, an end-to-end open-source platform for machine learningis the most popular tech skill of the last three years, exponentially increasing between 2016 and 2019.”

Its other two key projections according to Forbes are Udemy’s view that there will be a “robust demand for AI and data science skills, in addition to web development frameworks, cloud computing, and IT certifications, including AWS, CompTIA & Docker.” Also, SAP expertise (knowledge and qualifications of the  enterprise software to manage business operations and customer relations) “is projected to be the fastest-growing process-related skill set in 2020.”

In more detailed projections, it is said that “TensorFlow, OpenCV, and neural networks are the foundational skills many data scientists are pursuing and perfecting today to advance their AI-based career strategies. “ All these skills are a basis for understanding and developing artificial intelligence apps and platforms.

Talking about TensorFlow, Forbes notes that it is “a free and open-source software library for dataflow and differentiable programming across a range of tasks. It is a symbolic math library and is also used for machine learning applications such as neural networks. “

The other closely connected category in which Udemy found strong interest is Robotic Process Automation (RPA) and Business Process Management (BPM). As explained, Robotic Process Automation (RPA) refers to the use of process automation tools to quickly replicate how human beings perform routine daily office work using popular productivity apps including Microsoft Excel, databases, or web applications.

 

Spread the love
Continue Reading